Therapy Horse Registration

MINIATURE THERAPY HORSE REGISTRATION THROUGH SEVEN OAKS FARM MINIATURE THERAPY HORSES

There are 4 levels in our registration ranging from Apprentice to Master. The Apprentice is designed to test your horses’ ability to overcome obstacles and mark it ready to begin making visits. Each level must be mastered before advancement to the next.

Detailed logs are required for each level + pictures, as well as videos for levels requiring visit hours.

Horses advance through the levels of registration as they acquire:

  • a specified number of visits,

  • a minimum amount of visit hours,

  • total training hours, and

  • advance in the level of difficulty.

We’ve classified visits into two categories: soft visits and hard visits. A typical soft visit is a visit to your local Rural King or Home Depot as well as simple assisted living facility visits. These interactions are based on just a few people to see at a time and slow movement. Our medium impact visits start to move from day to night time visits, kids events and quicker movement. These visits can be stressful on horses if they’re not exposed through the process. The hard visits are reserved for advanced and master level registrations because of the quick movement, crowds of people visiting, and unknown atmospheres. The Master Level Registered horse succeeds in one-on-one visits, yet also feels comfortable with large crowds and loud music.


REGISTRATION LEVELS

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LEVEL I: The Apprentice Registration

Level I is designed to test the horse’s competency in various situations. The horse is required to maintain a sense of ease and order and show no signs of intense fear like rearing, kicking, biting or refusing a command by its handler. The handler is expected to show they have an understanding of the horse’s behaviors and is at the horse’s side as a leader and advocate.

Denver

Level II: The Intermediate Registration

Level II is designed to test the horse’s ability to do soft visits while still having the ability to pass the Level I requirements. The horse is expected to accept simple petting and behave during visits with residents, kids, or other people. The handler is expected to be the horse’s leader and advocate, as well as communicate effectively with people during visits.

 

Level III: The Advanced Registration

Level III is designed to test the horse during more stressful visits at daytime or nighttime events while still having the ability to pass the Level I and II requirements. The horse is expected to visit with people in closer proximity as well as deal with shadows and night lights. The handler is expected to be the horse’s leader and advocate, communicate effectively with people during visits, and always be aware of the horses’ behavior.

 

Level IV The Master Registration

Level IV is designed to test the horse during high stressful visits as well as parades while still having the ability to pass the Level I, II, and III requirements. The horse is expected to be able to go into most all situation with ease or little introduction to a new situation because the training has been intensive. The handler must have a keen eye and be aware of their surroundings, while also advocating for the horse. The handler is, as always, expected to be the horse’s leader, communicate effectively with people during visits, and have an ability to control and lead the horse during any circumstance.

*Very few horses reach and maintain this level of registration.


Each level has a very specific set of criteria and requirements.

The level are sequential, with Level I as the foundation and Level III and IV as more advanced. You begin with Level I to attain Level II, from Level II you gain more skills and move on to Level III. From Level III you will build even more skills and move to Level IV. Most horses will perform their duties from skills gained in Level I or II.

The level indicates the type of training a horse has to best thrive in a particular atmosphere.

Some horses will always stay at Level II, because the horse prefers one on one interaction with people. Other horses will be placed in the Level III or IV registration because the horse enjoys parades, high energy, lots of commotion, and large crowds of people. Evaluation during training will help determine proper registration and placement for each therapy horse.

The average age that a horse will start training will vary.

This is highly dependent upon the particular horse and their handler. The horse must be at least 6 months of age before you test for a Level I Registration; which means you can start training as early as you feel appropriate. The length of time to train for the different levels will depend on your horses’ abilities as well as your abilities as a trainer. Of course, all the time is affected by how much you are able to get your horse out to do all that has to be done.

You are responsible for keeping logs on training and visit hours, vet records, as well as pictures and videos of your activity with your horse. All these will be explained in detail in each level of registration.

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KEEP ME IN THE LOOP

Fill out this form if you are interested in the process of Miniature Therapy Horse Registration

Name *
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Please include how many horses you are interested in registering; and please let us know if you are interested in a handler certification alongside your horses' registration.

Learning Curve

Narrated by Kate

To give you a bit of background about me: I started out a “new” horsewoman. I spent my suburban childhood and college years without a single animal companion! (GASP!) The only animals we had in our home were a few fish … and they only lasted a few weeks before my dad tried to clean the tank. (Sorry dad!) I came home from school to an empty fish tank - so, fish were out. On top of that, my parents could never agree on a size of dog they wanted: dad wanted a great pyrenees like he had grown up with, and mom wanted a small dog that didn’t bark or shed… 🤔 (basically she wanted a stuffed toy) - so we never actually had animals.

Meeting horses for the first time was a bit intimidating for me. Honestly - just being on a farm with 6 dogs was a shock to me. But, in a sense I think that helped me in my training abilities. I was a clean slate. We have people of all abilities contact us, some have had horses (like Lisa) for practically their entire life. Others, have spent their life around horses, but have never owned any. Still others, have extensive experience with dogs but want to get involved with horses, and a few are just like me.

I’ll share one of my favorite learning stories, that may help open your eyes to some lessons your trainers have been trying to teach you.


Denver & the Scary Grate

Denver

We were out training in downtown Oxford. It was a gorgeous day, years ago, where we had visitors who were purchasing horses shadow us to get a feel for how we train our horses. We had started writing down our training material but didn’t have seminars available yet. Downtown Oxford has a nice piazza area where you can often hear bands playing and a nice lawn area where students were doing their homework and relaxing in the grass.

Steps are a big deal for horses, we all know that. But, try concrete steps with a grate at the bottom of them for drainage. I want to say we had Denver and Dallas out to train together. Dallas - like the champ he always is - walks carefree over the grate and up the four wide steps to the platform. Denver, starts to follow Dallas, but notices this strange grate and plants his feet. I squat down on the stairs (boo-boo #1) and give him a little pressure to move forward. He resists, so I let up on pressure to let him regroup. His head bobs down to smell the grate and I apply pressure again. He pulls back a bit but I “hold my ground” (boo-boo #2) and keep pressure to see if he will come forward. Sure enough - he caves into the pressure. But, did you notice boo-boo #1 was my squat? He caves into the pressure and jumps towards me. Practically on top of me. … Well… I was in shock. Lisa came over and took Denver so I could stand up and regroup.

Red in the face, I started to think, “there is no way I can handle horses!” I take Dallas from Lisa and she goes back at it with Denver. Remember that key that horses learn in pictures - that is NOT the kind of picture I want Denver using every time he sees stairs. Lisa takes him around the ramped sidewalk, back into the grass (careful to avoid stairs) and talks her way thru doing this again with Denver.

Keep moving, forward motion is always better. If he stops to smell the grate, which he thinks is a big black hole, let him, then turn around, regroup and head forward towards the steps again. Walk NEXT to him, say “step” and continue forward as if there is nothing out of the ordinary. If you are nervous, the horse will pick up on that. If they stop, turn around and try it again.

Low and behold, after giving him a second to smell the grate, turning around to regroup and walking towards the steps again; Denver took a leap over the grate and walked right up the steps. She continued this movement a few more times until the leap turned into a slightly elevated step. We end training on a positive note then walked back towards the trailer.


The Learning Curve

I am constantly learning! I don’t think I know near enough about how horses’ think or perceive the world. I do know for a fact - you can only get better if you practice. Learn from your mistakes, and create ground-rules for what to do in certain situations. Sure, I came into this with the least knowledge of all of us, but I think it has truly made me appreciate the bond I share with all the animals I have “started from the bottom” with. The relationship I have with Denver is quite a unique bond now, because we have made mistakes together and grown thru them. I’m thankful for my learning curve and hope to continue learning from each horse I have the pleasure of training with.

Therapy Horse Handler Certification

SEVEN OAKS FARM MINIATURE THERAPY HORSES
IS DEDICATED TO TEACHING OTHERS AND SHARING YEARS OF KNOWLEDGE AND EXPERTISE.

Creating a handler certification as well as a horse registration program has been a long-time goal of ours. We want to create a standard of excellence across the world of miniature therapy horses and animal assisted activities. Over the past few years, we have been teaching those across the country to replicate what we do; and by using that same material - we are creating a certification program to carry that excellence throughout the industry.

There are still details to work out; but we wanted to share the ideas we have for those who want to stay in the loop during this process.


Overview

MINIATURE THERAPY HORSES 103

This seminar is for those interested in handler certification! Miniature Therapy Horses 103 is available entirely online, so anyone around the world can work thru the materials, quizzes, and become certified as a miniature therapy horse handler.

CVG Airport

What you will receive:

  • In the mail:

    • 100+ page bound student guide and

    • DuPont healthcare training booklets with quizzes.

  • Through email:

    • Secure link with access to lecture videos, YouTube videos, and additional materials. There will be linked tests over each individual section, as well as a final exam.

To receive your handler certification, you will have to:

a) watch the lecture over the section;

b) complete a quiz after each lecture video;

c) watch any additional videos to reinforce the materials;

d) complete quizzes in the additional training series over specialized human resources and healthcare;

e) record videos of handling during visits;

f) provide a background check and;

g) complete a final exam.

After sending in the completed quizzes, background check and passing the final exam; expect an e-version of your Miniature Therapy Horse Handler Certification.

 

MINIATURE THERAPY HORSES 104

This handler certification program is geared for participants who have been through another one of our seminars. We highly recommend finishing either Miniature Therapy Horses 102 or 103, after which you can register for the Miniature Therapy Horses 104 course.

Version 2

Locations:

  • Ohio,

  • California,

  • Missouri,

  • Oregon, and

  • Florida.

This entirely hands-on seminar is to enhance everything you have learned in Miniature Therapy Horses 101, 102 and 103 to give you a full understanding of training and handling miniature therapy horses. You do not need to bring your own horses, all horses will be provided by the host farm.

Details:

  • 1-day Saturday course (dates TBD)

  • 9:00am - 7:30pm

  • Lunch and dinner are provided

  • Question & Answer sessions over meals

  • Limited class size: 10 participants

  • Full day of hands-on training with Lisa Moad & staff

  • Final exam after dinner

The exams will be graded by Lisa Moad and her staff; upon completion and passing of the exam, expect an e-version of your Advanced Miniature Therapy Horse Handler Certification.


INTERESTED?

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Seminar Preferance *
Please choose which seminar you are interested in (you can pick more than one).
If you are interested in hosting a 104 seminar, please let us know; we would love to connect!

Tips for a Great Visit #2

Great Facility Visits

When you make visits to over 75 assisted living facilities, you see a lot and learn a lot. We began to put together a list for activities directors so they could be prepared for the horses when we arrived. The list of tips was handed out during the pre-visit; we wanted to keep our staff and horses as well as the residents safe.

REMEMBER YOUR PRE-VISIT!

Being the directions and map genius of the group; Kate would make the pre-visit. She drove to the facility about a week or two in advance to meet the activities director and hand them a pre-visit packet with written documents about who we are, what all our handlers are required to go through and health certificates for all the therapy horses. We also include information about what a typical donation amount would be and why we need the donation, our W-9 form and tips to make the visit safe and enjoyable for everyone involved.

Tips for a Great Visit #1

A while back we posted our first tip for a great visit: #1 During every visit we provide for your facility, please have an activities director or staff member escort our teams for the entirety of the visit. If our team is left unattended for any reason we will terminate the visit. We make this explicitly clear during the pre-visit to make sure we are not trapped in a lockdown unit or walk into a quarantined room without prior knowledge. Having someone who is familiar with the residents escort you through the facility is a life-saver. They know the patients well enough to let you know who may have an aggressive tendency, who might bite or grab, and alert you to that before you enter the room. They will also know all the door codes to lockdown units and - if there were any issues, could be another set of eyes. If you plan to bring more than one team in for a visit, make sure there is an escort with each team; always err on the safer side.

Tips for a Great Visit #2

This tip is also very important during your pre-visit. The second tip for a great visit: #2 Determine who we will visit and if we are visiting a group or individuals. Make sure you talk thru a plan at the pre-visit with the activities director before you arrive the day of with the horses. Remember too, if you decide to visit this facility once a month that you can rotate visitors; one month a group visit, the next month switch to individualized visits. This way, you can visit with different patients and bring various horses. The residents always enjoy meeting new horses; but be prepared for residents to learn their names and ask for them the next time!

Check the Surroundings

When you get to the facility on your pre-visit, it is a good idea to “scope out the space”. At your pre-visit, discuss where you can park your vehicle and where they would like you to enter and exit. Many facilities will “cone off” an area the day of our visit. Typically, the activities director will have an area in mind for you to visit with their residents. Here are some things to think about when looking at a room (or patio area) for a therapy horse visit:

  • most of the group visitors will likely be in wheelchairs which will require extra space and the need to move around,

  • see how the sun or light exposure is coming in, and look for shadows,

  • point out any tight spaces,

  • take not of the flooring and/or plants in the room,

  • for patio area - look for grass, and

  • locate any medical equipment and placement.

Make sure to look for things as you walk through the building that might be new to your horses (ie: a bird cage) and add that to your training list. If you are asked to use an elevator, note the small differences between this one and others your horse may have been exposed to. For us, an elevator is an elevator; but for horses, even one detail that is different - makes it a new experience.

REVIEW AND MAKE IT CLEAR

When you’re finishing your pre-visit, make sure you review with the activities director the details of the visit. If you have decided the facility will have a group visit to start - that is the plan. Let the director know the type of visit determines the horses that you will bring so changes cannot be made. We are very firm with the idea that “The Plan is the Plan” and making changes at the last minute may mean that their visit will be shortened or canceled.

Hot Topic: Potty Trained?

CAN YOU TRULY “POTTY TRAIN” A HORSE?

This is something that is a true argument between miniature horse owners. Before we start the conversation, we need to clarify a few details:

  1. The idea of potty training. When people hear potty training, they typically assume you are talking about a dog. Where: the dog itself is trained to stand by a door or bark until you, the owner, pays attention and lets the animal out to go potty. The animals are signaling to the owner that they need to relieve themselves. The owner doesn’t need to constantly be on watch for signs.

  2. With-holding food. For a horse to be healthy - they need to be eating 18-20 hours of the day. Otherwise, they develop ulcers and can have serious health problems. Certainly, if an animal isn’t given food - they won’t need any relief. But, for horses to be healthy… this is not an option.

  3. Horses enjoy routine. If they are used to doing the same thing - chances are, they will get used to that routine and stick with it. That routine is developed and they know to relieve themselves in the same spot over a period of time; such as a special place in the yard or in the trailer.

  4. Horses do not have the sense to “hold it” like a trained dog (and human) can do. They will just go. And handlers are always on guard to watch the animal for signs or signals.

Okay: so with these details… You can start to see why we believe:

Horses cannot be potty trained in the same sense that a dog can be potty trained.

 

Dog vs. Horse Potty Training

Dallas, Buddy, and Skye

When an animal is “potty trained” they are considered to know that relieving themselves inside is bad, and that they need to alert their owner that they need to go. The owner can be doing other things, and will be alerted by the animal itself; there is no constant-following or supervision to watch the animal to make sure they don’t go in the house - since they are trained. With that explained; horses do not give a sign to their owner, rather, the hander needs to be on constant lookout to watch their horse for signs.

Here’s an example: I know when Wendy starts to move around after an hour of standing still during a visit, that we need to go outside to let her relieve herself. She hasn’t announced through pawing or nudging (signs she is trained not to do during a visit anyways) that she needs to relieve herself, instead I am watching for a sign. AND I know we have been on a visit for about an hour - the typical timeframe a horse will need to relieve itself anyways. So we go outside to the trailer and she relieves herself.

 

With-holding Food

Now, I’ve already mentioned how often horses need to be eating. We never-ever keep food away from the horses before a visit. There is always hay in the trailer with water in a bucket, or at least in a sealed container since certain horses like knocking over the water 😏… and they will always be offered water before and after a visit. (I think I nailed this one on the head now.)

 

Routine

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Herd animals enjoy doing the same thing over and over again. Have you ever noticed horses getting bent out of shape when you feed at a different time than “usual”? The nature of these animals is to follow the same routine. So naturally, if they are used to the routine of a visit they will automatically learn that after a certain task is performed they continue to the next. Our pre-visit routine is the same each time: a) bathe the horses, b) let them dry in the corral, c)load into the trainer {cue relieving themselves, also because they smell it}, d) make the visit, e) return to the trailer {again, a cue to relieve themselves} f) return home and roll in the dirt. See: although the visit location of the visit may differ, the routine is always the same. Notice with the more veteran therapy horses… take Denver for example. When we put on a BunBag, vest, clean his hooves and brush his mane and tail he seems to “get in the mood” for the visit. He understands this is the same as always and has very trusting relationship with us. His head drops and he is ready for visitors.

But wait: You still put on a BunBag?

YES! We will always put a BunBag on. When we were first doing training visits years ago, we were getting so caught up and nervous watching the horse for signs that we couldn’t focus on the patient/horse experience. The bags are a security for us as handlers. Then, we don’t have to keep watching and honestly, stressing, to watch and observe the horse for signs they may have to go. Remember, horses can hear your heartbeat - so when your anxiety increases your heart rate increases and the horses will notice that and become unsettled with you.

Fun Fact: Horses only pee 2 - 3 times a day; However, they will poop almost every hour.

Also consider: if you are doing a visit where your horses are eating in the grass while visitors pet them - they will more than like poop during that visit. What goes in always comes out.

Always Remember: Horse are unpredictable.

You could think your horse is doing well remembering the routine of a visit, but something can always happen. Even our more experienced horses have pooped in their bag during a visit. Some horses are coined as “double-poopers” and we keep note of that. These are horses that will stress poop for various reasons. You just never know. And instead of constantly watching our horse for signs, simply leaving the relieving to be relieved; we can have a fun enjoyable visit with a built-in safety net for the horse.

We never leave the farm without a bag on, that is our policy. I take everything we came with back to the farm.


DOES THIS TOPIC INTEREST YOU? TAKE ONE OF OUR SEMINARS


Lives Change.

“See ya’ Later, Love You!”

You know that feeling of sending your kids off to college? Each time is never easier than the first. My horses hold a very special place in my heart. Sending three of our favorite horses to start a program in Harrison, Ohio this weekend was very exciting - but difficult.

Our Mission

It is our goal as trainers of therapy horses to build a relationship with these horses. The process of training a horse for therapy is a full-time job. In order to keep our horses trained for what we do, they need constant, consistent work. We spend hundreds of hours with these 4-legged creatures getting them comfortable in all types of situations. They come in our home, ride in the van with us, and we even spend our “off-time” in the lot watching them eat. TRUST is most important. We develop a love and understanding with all of our horses and that bond cannot be broken.

After years of training, visits, adventure and lots of laughter; our path has shifted. We are now focusing on equipping others in the world of miniature therapy horses to start their own world-class program. Many of the attendants at Lisa Moad’s seminars have been driven to start programs and have everything they need - except the horses. So, we decided to gift some of our best therapy horses to budding programs across the United States. We want to help others to spread as much joy as we have.

 

Welcome to Harrison, Ohio!

 

BUCK OWENS & KENTUCKY THUNDER

“Buck” & “Tuck” will be the founding members of a therapy program created by Christine Jonas and her daughter, Katie. Chris has such a passion for helping others, and she immediately fell in love with the idea of using miniature therapy horses to assist others. Her daughter, Katie has a history with horses and is excited to work with these two cuties. Both Katie and Chris fell in love with Tuck when they visited, and Buck wanted to follow them everywhere! These boys will be an excellent start to their future program.

 

BOCEPHUS

While these two ladies were at the farm, they couldn’t take their eyes off of Bo. (But honestly, who can 😉!) His gorgeous mane & tail and loving personality really makes him quite an amazing boy. They were hooked. Bo will continue his training with them, living a life of luxury. The decision to sell Bo was a very difficult one. We have loved this boy with all our heart during his years at the farm, but we know these ladies will do amazing things with him.

There are tears EVERY TIME we send horses off to their new programs and homes. This is never easy, but it is our way of giving back even more than we already have been able to do. Change is inevitable, and we have been blessed to see the difference we have made over the years. Now, we focus on training others to continue the mission of: When Compassion Meets Action; Lives Change. We have a passion for serving others, and our ministry will continue on with the groups we have been able to gift these amazing therapy horses to.

Serving Others. Bringing Joy. Offering Hope.

Transporting Minis to Events

Horse Transportation

There’s been a lot of debate on how to transport minis during visits. For convenience sake, it’s very easy to park a van or 150 series vehicle in a parking space. But, have you consider the safety of these smaller “parking space” size vehicles?

Please, please, please:

… make sure you have some type of partition in your vehicle to keep your horse{s} secure in the back. If you happened to get in an accident, or you need to brake quickly, you wouldn't want your precious cargo coming thru the front window. Yes, the videos are so cute and go “viral” on Social-Media when a horse in the backseat. But take a step back to think about the ramifications; is it really that meaningful to get social “likes” instead of keeping animals’ safety a priority? Confession, we have put a horse or two in the back of our Subaru. But: what if we were rear-ended, or worse - had to stop suddenly; would anything be holding these precious horse(s) in my backseat. ….

Ford Transit

Option:

We purchased a Ford Transit & a custom made box stall. The stall was secured in the back of the van by connection to the metal frame; keeping both horses & humans safe. The smaller (mind you, smaller than a truck and trailer) vehicle was easy to park - especially during downtown visits where parking was an issue. And, it was a nice backup incase something happened to the truck or trailer.

The purchase of our Ford Transit was at the height of visit demand. We were getting more requests than one team could handle, so we hired another handler and purchased this van. We could now have two different teams making therapy horse visits in one day! What great fun! With a growing team of trained therapy horses, we were able to make a difference in the lives of twice as many people as before!

 

Also something to consider: insurance

Some insurance companies would throw out your insurance if they find out you are transporting live animals in your back seat ...  There are only a handful of insurance companies that allow transport of horses. Now horses in particular, in the back seat of your vehicle. Geico is one of them. But, make sure you call and talk to your insurance provider to make sure they are very clear that you are hauling a miniature horse in your vehicle, and that you have taken all the necessary precautions to ensure the safety of both the horses and humans.

 

It comes down to personal preference.

We still find ourselves resorting back to the “traditional” mode of transporting horses - a truck and trailer. Yes, it can prove difficult sometimes and people don’t always respect your space. But - there is nothing more funny than watching peoples’ reactions when we pull up with this giant rig and out trot two barely 30” tall horses decked out in bows and vests. COME ON! Gets us every time.

Bittersweet Love

Today we sent three of our country western stars across the country to Utah & Oregon. Alan Jackson, Jimmy Buffett, and Dolly Parton.

Saying "goodbye" to animals after long hours of training is always a sad day. We have so much love for the animals we work with - sometimes they are considered closer than blood related relatives! (Shhh! 😅) We learn a lot not only about the horse we are working with, but inevitably we learn something about ourselves as well. These three have made a resounding impact on us that we are sure to cherish for years.

Alan Jackson & Jimmy Buffett

Alan & Jimmy are headed to an experienced equestrian in Utah. They will be welcomed with a grand party upon their arrival + the continuation of training to be therapy horses. We are so happy these two are going to Colleen, and can't wait to see where her program goes. 

Dolly Parton

Dolly will be joining an esteemed program in Oregon; Elderberry Lane. She will join therapy horses and donkeys alike to lift spirits of children in the area. Dolly will also continue her therapy training with Joni creating a lasting bond between them.

 

Both Colleen & Joni have taken some form of Lisa's Miniature Therapy Horse Seminars and both ladies have a fond love of all kinds of animals. We are sad to see these three leave the farm, but very excited for this opportunity to continue doing what they do best.  

Serving Others. Bringing Joy. Offering Hope. 


Read all about the horses Lisa Moad has gifted to therapy horse programs across the United States.


Listen Up!

Therapy Horses on Sirius XM

Do you have Sirius XM Radio? Then you’re in luck! Lisa will be on-air talking about our therapy horses and the special effect they have on all those we visit.

The deets:

  • Thursday, April 18th

  • 3:00pm CST

  • Shark Farmer

  • SXM: Channel 147


Here’s a little bit about Rob Sharkey, taken from his webpage. To learn more about his podcasts & radio show, click here.

 

THE MAN, THE MYTH, THE FARMER:

ROB SHARKEY

Rob Sharkey, known in digital circles as The Shark Farmer, is not your average Illinois grain farmer. He’s a disruptor who is unwavering in his ability to directly address controversial topics.

Rob tackles life, alongside his high school sweetheart, Emily, knowing four smaller sharks in their school will be impacted by their choices.

With the hog crash of ‘98 in the rearview mirror, a turn-key outfitting business thriving, and a handful of acres demanding more time than is warranted, the only logical step was to launch a necessary - yet stupendously groundbreaking - podcast.

His provocative style parallels a story-based structure, which resonates with thousands of weekly, global listeners. Juxtapose his rough-around-the-edges persona with an unmatched ability to listen and relate to those spanning generations, time zones, and the rural/urban divide, and you’ve found the formula for an under-the-radar and out-of-the-box communicator.

And, he’s just getting started.